motherhood regret

Pronatalism’s Impact on Motherhood Regret

A recent article in the Life/Parent section of The Toronto Star took on a topic we’ve been seeing more of these days: motherhood regret. This article, “Mothers not alone in regret over having children” speaks to one of the most central pronatalist myths that all too often drives women to have children. Continue reading “Pronatalism’s Impact on Motherhood Regret”

Humanism

Lawrence Krauss

The Connection Between Humanism & The Baby Matrix

Have you heard of Humanism? Upon reading the Nov/Dec 2015 edition of The Humanist published by the American Humanist Association, I learned a lot about the tenets of Humanism. In this edition, I was particularly moved by the article adapted from the 2015 Humanist of the Year award acceptance speech by theoretical physicist, Lawrence Krauss. Continue reading “The Connection Between Humanism & The Baby Matrix”

talking about childfree choice

Where Are We, After 40+ Years of Talking About the Childfree Choice?

As 2015 came to a close, it marked another year of talking about the childfree choice  Let’s take stock. In the big picture, we’ve seen an ascent of talk about this choice in the public sphere since the 70s. That’s over four decades. Where are we after 40+ years of talking about the childfree choice? Let’s start with a quick broad stroke look back in time: Continue reading “Where Are We, After 40+ Years of Talking About the Childfree Choice?”

childfree in china

A Chinese Reader’s Take on Families of Two & The Baby Matrix

I recently received an e-letter from someone in China (who wishes to remain anonymous) who read my books, Families of Two and The Baby Matrix. With permission to share it, here are candid thoughts and insightful commentary on being childfree in China and its reproductive culture: Continue reading “A Chinese Reader’s Take on Families of Two & The Baby Matrix”

The Baby Matrix

Sociologist C. Wright Mills

The Baby Matrix in College Coursework: An Interview with Kimya Dennis, Ph.D.

Last year I had the pleasure of doing a Q&A with sociologist and criminologist, Kimya Dennis, Ph.D. (left), who was doing a study on childfree black women. I recently had another chance to talk with her. She is an Assistant Professor at Salem College, and is currently teaching a sociology course using The Baby Matrix as part of the curriculum. Here’s the Q&A: Continue reading “The Baby Matrix in College Coursework: An Interview with Kimya Dennis, Ph.D.”

Laura Carroll, LiveTrue books

Print and Digital Book Cultures: Can They Exist Side by Side?

With the advent and innovations of print technology, there is a lot of talk about whether printed books are well on the road to dead. Author Alix Christie has an interesting view in the San Francisco Chronicle – check it out.   Continue reading “Print and Digital Book Cultures: Can They Exist Side by Side?”

Laura Carroll, The Baby Matrix

Overpopulation: Check out this Excellent Documentary in the Making

I recently had the pleasure of being interviewed for the upcoming documentary by Anchored Minds Productions: Sense & Sustainability. Written and directed by Michael and Amanda Connolly, this is going to be one great film about overpopulation. Here is the synopsis: Continue reading “Overpopulation: Check out this Excellent Documentary in the Making”

Laura Carroll, professional book review

Nod to Black History Month: Great African American Nonfiction Books

This month being Black History Month, I’ve been perusing some great African American nonfiction. Before I list some books to check out, do you know how Black History Month started? Check it out. Continue reading “Nod to Black History Month: Great African American Nonfiction Books”

Nonfiction Books To Be Thankful For

Reading Rifflebooks giving thanks for November nonfiction releases inspired me to think about nonfiction books I am thankful for… There are so many! Here are just two that immediately came to mind: Continue reading “Nonfiction Books To Be Thankful For”

On Teaching Students to Love Nonfiction

Forty-six states and Washington D.C. have adopted what are called Common Core State Standards for their schools. What have some English teachers been outraged about? They require students to be reading primarily nonfiction by the time they are in high school.  As the San Francisco Chronicle put it… Continue reading “On Teaching Students to Love Nonfiction”