childfree trends

Looking Back: 2017 Childfree Trending Part II

Now for Part II of childfree trends we have seen this past year. In addition to muddied use of “Childfree,” “Child-free” “Child free “and “Childless” I wrote about in Part I, five more childfree trends are worth noting: Continue reading “Looking Back: 2017 Childfree Trending Part II”

childfree trends

Looking Back: 2017 Childfree Trending Part I

At the beginning of 2016, I took stock of 40+ years of talking about the childfree choice. At the end of 2016, I looked back and discussed positive childfree trends that year. It’s time for childfree trending 2017…this year I’ll do childfree trending in two parts. Here’s Part I: Continue reading “Looking Back: 2017 Childfree Trending Part I”

holiday season

Holiday Season Advertisers: It’s Time to Target Women without Children

Every holiday season, advertisers spend billions of marketing dollars to get us to buy their products and services. At this time of year, advertisers lose revenue because they don’t market to a specific demographic: the 47 percent of American women of childbearing age who are not mothers. Continue reading “Holiday Season Advertisers: It’s Time to Target Women without Children”

Lilli Blackmore

Riffing on Childfree Lilli Blackmore’s, “Why Having Kids Is Not A Retirement Plan”

I have been enjoying Lilli Blackmore’s posts on her site, the American Spinster. Her most recent post, “Why Having Kids Is Not a Retirement Plan” inspires me to riff on this important topic. Please indulge me. Continue reading “Riffing on Childfree Lilli Blackmore’s, “Why Having Kids Is Not A Retirement Plan””

moral duty

Not Having Kids: From Moral Outrage toward Moral Duty

One particular phrase relating to a study that came out last spring continues to pop up online: moral outrage. The study, “Parenthood as a Moral Imperative? Moral Outrage and the Stigmatization of Voluntarily Childfree Women and Men” has a finding that not having children by choice “inspires moral outrage in others.” While the study’s author Leslie Ashburn-Nardo acknowledges “mean levels of moral outrage were small overall” and it can be argued that the media have overblown this finding, it’s worth asking why people can feel morally outraged by the childfree. Here are two big reasons why. Continue reading “Not Having Kids: From Moral Outrage toward Moral Duty”